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Here’s what to know in the Dallas-Fort Worth area

We’re keeping track of the most up-to-date news about the coronavirus in the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area. Check back for updates.

TARRANT COUNTY PASSES 200 COVID-19 DEATHS AND 8,000 CASES, WITH 6 NEW DEATHS REPORTED
Tarrant County reported six more coronavirus deaths and 277 new cases on Thursday.

The latest pandemic deaths include three Keller residents, two Arlington residents and a Mansfield man in his 80s. Fort Worth Cryptocurrency News The Keller deaths included a woman in her 50s, a man in his 80s and a woman in her 90s. The two Arlington deaths were women in their 50s and 80s.



All six had underlying conditions, according to health officials.

Tarrant County has confirmed a total of 8,099 COVID-19 cases, including 205 deaths and at least 3,627 recoveries. The 277 cases are tentatively the third-most cases reported in a day in the county. There were 481 cases reported on May 9, 306 on June 11, and 276 on Wednesday, according to county data.

Of the total deaths in the county, about 46% have been white, 25% have been Hispanic, 24% have been Black, 3% have been Asian/Pacific Islander, Fort Worth Stock Market and 1% each have been American Indian, other, and unreported.

DALLAS COUNTY REPORTS ‘TIP OF THE ICEBERG’ OF COVID-19 SURGE WITH 392 CASES, 5 DEATHS
Dallas County reported 392 new coronavirus cases and five more deaths on Thursday.

County health officials also reported a pandemic-high 423 COVID-19 hospitalizations. Across the 19-county North Texas region, hospitalizations are up by 200 patients to 923, according to officials.

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It’s the ninth consecutive day Dallas County has reported at least 300 new cases. The county has confirmed a total of 15,648 COVID-19 cases, including 307 deaths. The 392 cases reported Thursday are the second-highest single-day total. The 413 reported Wednesday are the most.

The latest deaths include a Grand Prairie woman in her 50s, a Dallas man in his 60s, a Carrollton man in his 80s, a Dallas man in his 90s, and a Mesquite man in his 90s who was a resident of a long-term care facility. The Mesquite man is the only one of the five with no underlying health condition.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins warned about the importance of increased hospitalizations.

“This number is the one to watch most closely as this represents the tip of the iceberg that you can see and gives an indication to the amount of COVID-19 cases spreading in the community that you are yet to see,” Jenkins said in a release.


COVID-19 HOSPITALIZATIONS OVERTIME

Coronavirus daily hospitalization counts in Texas and the larger Trauma Service Areas, beginning April 8, 2020. Data provided by Texas Health and Human Services.

FORT WORTH MAYOR TO ISOLATE AFTER CONTACT WITH A PERSON WHO HAS THE NOVEL CORONAVIRUS Fort Worth Press Release Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price said Thursday night that she had had contact with a person who tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

The mayor said she did not have symptoms of the virus and would isolate in an abundance of caution.

The contact was with a “community member” she did not describe.

Price was tested for the virus and said she would learn the result on Friday. She said she would not attend events until the test result is clear.

FORT WORTH-AREA WOMAN LOST HUSBAND OF 30 YEARS TO COVID. SHE KNOWS IT’S NOT THE FLU.
Going home is the worst. The door opens, and the silence and the quiet encroach at every step to remind Kelly Morton of her husband’s absence.

Joel Morton’s clothes are still there. If she is close, she can smell the cologne embedded into the fabric.

Going to work isn’t much better, because they worked together at the store they owned, Cactus Jack’s Boot Country in Alvarado. Going out isn’t that much better, because … Fort Worth Sports News where can you go?

“It’s hard to get up every day,” she said.

It’s been more than two months since her husband of 30 years, Joel, died of COVID-19. His was one of the first deaths in Tarrant County.

Morton has seen the numbers. She has read the news and the followed the debate of whether the measures to slow the spread were ultimately more harmful than helpful — that COVID is basically the flu.



She is a small business owner. She has lived all of this in way that few have.

“I just don’t know,” she said. “You can think what you want to think. This is all a very new disease. People who are healthy are getting it. Kids are getting it. Old people are getting it. Who knows?

“I think they are trying. But do I think this is real? Hell yeah, I think it’s real. It took my husband.”

Source - https://www.star-telegram.com/news/coronavirus/article243654072.html

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